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What: Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment Exhibit

When: March 10-April 30; opening reception Saturday, March 10, 1pm

Where: The Museum of Work & Culture, 42 S. Main St., Woonsocket



Museum of Work & Culture to Exhibit Work of Artists on the Autism Spectrum

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – The Museum of Work & Culture will host Through Our Eyes, an exhibit by the Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research & Treatment (RI-CART).


All of the work on display was created by artists with autism and related neurodevelopmental conditions and will be exhibited through April 30 as part of the MoWC’s events planned for Autism Awareness Month. The show is curated by Hartford, Conn.-based artist Matthew Best.


A public opening reception for the exhibit will take place on Saturday, March 10, from 1 to 3pm. The reception will include additional performance-based works, as well as a special presentation by art therapist Emily Ellis on the process of and science behind art therapy.


This event is also part of Brain Week Rhode Island (March 11-19), a weeklong celebration of brain health and brain science for Rhode Islanders of all ages. Creative learning activities and events include expert panels, talks, film screenings, workshops, and a Brain Fair with interactive science exhibits. For more brainy fun, visit


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RI-CART is a state-wide research network built on a partnership between families and individuals, clinicians, educators, and researchers. Our goal is to work together to improve services and quality of life for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and their families. Your voice doesn't just count. It's vital.


About the Museum of Work & Culture

The interactive and educational Museum of Work & Culture shares the stories of the men, women, and children who came to find a better life in Rhode Island’s mill towns in the late 19th- and 20th centuries. It recently received a Rhode Island Monthly Best of Rhode Island Award for its SensAbilities Saturdays all-ability program.


About the Rhode Island Historical Society

Founded in 1822, the RIHS, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is the fourth-oldest historical society in the United States and is Rhode Island’s largest and oldest historical organization. In Providence, the RIHS owns and operates the John Brown House Museum, a designated National Historic Landmark, built in 1788; the Aldrich House, built in 1822 and used for administration and public programs; and the Mary Elizabeth Robinson Research Center, where archival, book, and image collections are housed. In Woonsocket, the RIHS manages the Museum of Work and Culture, a community museum examining the industrial history of northern Rhode Island and of the workers and settlers, especially French-Canadians, who made it one of the state’s most distinctive areas.